The Vegetarian Hundred

A long-time reader here at Tigers & Strawberries, upon reading my participatory post for Dave of Very Good Taste’s list of one hundred comestibles that every omnivore should try at least once, entitled The Omnivore’s Hundred, said that someone should make a list of one hundred foods that vegetarians should eat at least once.

I thought Alexis had a great idea, so here is my version: The Vegetarian’s Hundred. Included in this list are both vegan dishes and vegetarian dishes which include the use of dairy products and eggs. I chose to not go strictly vegan in my list because while I have been eating more and more vegetarian meals this past few years, I am by no means a vegan, so I just don’t feel qualified to really choose the 100 vegan dishes that everyone needs to try.

Why am I doing this?

Well, mostly for fun, but also to see where the idea goes. If you want to play along, here’s how you do it: copy the list, including my instructions, and bold any items you have eaten and strike out any you would never eat, and then post it to your blog. If you want, you can leave a comment here, linking to your results, or you can link back to this post so I can try and keep tabs on what folks have eaten and not eaten. Finally, if you think something else should be on the list–feel free to add that to your post, and add any comments you like to your own posting of the list. I am just as curious to see what people have to say about food as whether or not they have eaten them.

Before I start, I want to let you know how I chose the foods, which are in no particular order of importance, they are just in the order in which I thought of them. Basically, these are the foods that I think that these are the vegetarian foods that -everyone- should try, not just vegetarians, because they are amazingly good. Each of these foods puts the lie to the still-prevalent idea that vegetarian and especially vegan food, is either boring, hard to make or just plain bad. These are flavors that I think are not only amazingly good, but they are also ones that I think are pretty accessible to everyone.

You will notice a preponderance of non-Western dishes. (But there are still a lot of European and American classics represented, have no fear.) There is a reason for that–around the world, there are many cultures where vegetarian dishes are important parts of the diets of large numbers of people. Any time you have that many people eating a food, you can be pretty certain that it is going to taste good, because frankly, it has to be. This isn’t always the case of course, but staple foods tend to be tasty ones. You will also note that I have a bias towards freshly made items, because I believe that fresh is better. (Unless we are talking about fermented foods–then, fermented is better!)

I think that lists like this very definitely show the biases of the list maker. I am certain that many things about my personality, cooking style and food biases can be inferred from this list.

As for a vegan list–I will leave that project in the capable hands of one of the many vegan food bloggers out there in the blogosphere.

The Vegetarian Hundred

1. Real macaroni and cheese, made from scratch and baked
2. Tabouleh
3. Freshly baked bread, straight from the oven (preferably with homemade strawberry jam)
4. Fresh figs
5. Fresh pomegranate
6. Indian dal of any sort
7. Imam bayildi
8. Pressed spiced Chinese tofu
9. Freshly made hummus
10. Tahini
11. Kimchi
12. Miso
13. Falafel
14. Potato and pea filled samosas
15. Homemade yogurt
16. Muhammara
17. Brie en croute
18. Spanikopita
19. Fresh, vine-ripened heirloom tomatoes
20. Insalata caprese
21. Stir-fried greens (gai lan, bok choi, pea shoots, kale, chard or collards)
22. Freshly made salsa
23. Freshly made guacamole
24. Creme brulee
25. Fava beans
26. Chinese cold sesame peanut noodles
27. Fattoush
28. New potatoes
29. Coleslaw
30. Ratatouille
31. Baba ganoush
32. Winter squash
33. Roasted beets
34. Baked sweet potatoes
35. Plantains
36. Chocolate truffles
37. Garlic mashed potatoes
38. Fresh water chestnuts
39. Steel cut oats
40. Quinoa
41. Grilled portabello mushrooms
42. Chipotle en adobo
43. Stone ground whole grain cornmeal
44. Freshly made corn or wheat tortillas
45. Frittata
46. Basil pesto
47. Roasted garlic
48. Raita of any type
49. Mango lassi
50. Jasmine rice (white or brown)
51. Thai vegetarian coconut milk curry
52. Pumpkin in any form other than pie
53. Fresh apple pear or plum gallette
54. Quince in any form
55. Escarole, endive or arugula
56. Sprouts other than mung bean
57. Naturally brewed soy sauce
58. Dried shiitake mushrooms
59. Unusually colored vegetables (purple cauliflower, blue potatoes, chocolate bell peppers…)
60. Fresh peach ice cream
61. Chevre
62. Medjool dates
63. Kheer
64. Flourless chocolate cake
65. Grilled corn on the cob
66. Black bean (or any other bean) vegetarian chili
67. Tempeh
68. Seitan or wheat gluten
69. Gorgonzola or any other blue veined cheese
70. Sweet potato fries
71. Homemade au gratin potatoes
72. Cream of asparagus soup
73. Artichoke-Parmesan dip
74. Mushroom risotto
75. Fermented black beans
76. Garlic scapes
77. Fresh new baby peas
78. Kalamata olives
79. Preserved lemons
80. Fried green tomatoes
81. Chinese scallion pancakes
82. Cheese souffle
83. Fried apples
84. Homemade frijoles refritos
85. Pasta fagiole
86. Macadamia nuts in any form
87. Paw paw in any form
88. Grilled cheese sandwich of any kind
89. Paneer cheese
90. Ma Po Tofu (vegetarian style–no pork!)
91. Fresh pasta in any form
92. Grilled leeks, scallions or ramps
93. Green papaya salad
94. Baked grain and vegetable stuffed tomatoes
95. Pickled ginger
96. Methi greens
97. Aloo paratha
98. Kedgeree (the original Indian version without the smoked fish, not the British version with fish)
99. Okra
100. Roasted brussels sprouts

There it is–my list of 100 vegetarian foods that everyone–not just vegetarians–should eat at least once. rest assured that I have eaten all of these at least once, and the truth is, I like nearly all of these foods a great deal. There are a couple of exceptions, and they are related to each other. While I love blue-veined cheeses, I am sensitive to blue-green molds, which is probably related to my penicillin allergy. So, I -can- eat the cheeses, but I generally get very ill after I do so, so I try to avoid them. In fact, just about any cheese with bloom or mold on it I tend to avoid, or in the case of brie and similar cheese, I cut the rind away.

Similarly, I do not much care for tempeh–it is inoculated with a mold in order to produce it, and because of that, I tend to leave it alone. The flavor is okay, but my stomach gets queasy just smelling it, so I leave it be.

Everything else on this list is okay by me. I addition to putting together a fun game to play, I have also maybe given readers new ideas in vegetarian foods to try sometime.

62 Comments

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  1. 92. Grilled leeks, scallions or ramps

    I have had roasted, never grilled and I can’t think how to grill them so that they don’t go black or get all crunchy in all the wrong ways.

    Roasted, they end up in a gloriously gooey mass that is delicious however you devour it.

    Comment by Torrilin — September 4, 2008 #

  2. Here are my results.

    A good list. I memed it, so that’s good for you, right? :)

    Comment by Malcolm — September 4, 2008 #

  3. Torrilin – I had access to a three-section gas grill; I turned the heat all the way up on the backmost section and grilled the leeks up front, cut side down and slathered in olive oil, for about four minutes. The crispyness was a feature.

    I only managed 57/100. I’m a little disappointed in myself, to tell the truth.

    Comment by Boosette — September 4, 2008 #

  4. I’ve eaten a LOT more of these than I have of the omnivore’s checklist. And there’s a grand total of ONE thing on this list that I would not be delighted to try or to eat again. (It’s coleslaw – I hate mayonnaise unless it’s at least 50% garlic.)

    Comment by Fernmonkey — September 4, 2008 #

  5. Ag no man Barbara I’m still busy with the previous 100 :-) Must say, this list is easier than the first one. Amazing how many things on the list I’ve prepared over an open fire / coals.

    http://www.retro.co.za/blog/?p=258

    Comment by Wouter — September 4, 2008 #

  6. Great. Now I’m hungry, and it’s only 9 am.

    Comment by Erika — September 4, 2008 #

  7. I’ve always thought of kedgeree as a fish dish…

    Comment by Andrew — September 4, 2008 #

  8. Interesting list. 60 of 100. Amazing how many things I’ve been meaning to try but haven’t. Like roasted brussel sprouts. How it is exactly that I’ve missed those is beyond me.

    Comment by Kari — September 4, 2008 #

  9. Wow, thank you! I will definitely post this in my own journal later, have to run to work just now.

    Comment by Alexis — September 4, 2008 #

  10. 1. Real macaroni and cheese, made from scratch and baked
    2. Tabouleh
    3. Freshly baked bread, straight from the oven (preferably with homemade strawberry jam)
    4. Fresh figs
    5. Fresh pomegranate
    6. Indian dal of any sort
    7. Imam bayildi — I must admit that I was the one who cooked this and I didn’t enjoy it that much, but I was young and doubt I did a good job of it.

    8. Pressed spiced Chinese tofu
    9. Freshly made hummus
    10. Tahini
    11. Kimchi
    12. Miso
    13. Falafel

    14. Potato and pea filled samosas — I’ve had lots of other kinds but I don’t recall having these. I could be wrong.
    15. Homemade yogurt — Used to think this was the best tasting sort until I tried Greek-style yoghurt.
    16. Muhammara — I’ve just never run across it.
    17. Brie en croute — One of the most decadent foods ever.
    18. Spanikopita
    19. Fresh, vine-ripened heirloom tomatoes
    20. Insalata caprese — A well-prepared one is a joy.
    21. Stir-fried greens (gai lan, bok choi, pea shoots, kale, chard or collards) — I’ve had all sorts. Some are wonderful, some tolerable. All worth trying.
    22. Freshly made salsa
    23. Freshly made guacamole — Let me be blunt here: If the restaurant where you eat guacamole doesn’t make it fresh, find another restaurant.
    24. Creme brulee

    25. Fava beans
    26. Chinese cold sesame peanut noodles
    27. Fattoush
    28. New potatoes — a touch of butter, a whisper of salt and a light dusting of dill or parsley. Proof of a benevolent universe.
    29. Coleslaw
    30. Ratatouille
    31. Baba ganoush — I keep trying this and not liking it. It must be me, but I just don’t know.
    32. Winter squash — This is one of those things that evokes everything I love best about autumn and winter, so I rarely eat it out of season.
    33. Roasted beets
    34. Baked sweet potatoes
    35. Plantains
    36. Chocolate truffles
    37. Garlic mashed potatoes

    38. Fresh water chestnuts
    39. Steel cut oats — For my money, the only sort worth eating.
    40. Quinoa
    41. Grilled portabello mushrooms

    42. Chipotle en adobo
    43. Stone ground whole grain cornmeal
    44. Freshly made corn or wheat tortillas
    45. Frittata
    46. Basil pesto
    47. Roasted garlic
    48. Raita of any type
    49. Mango lassi
    50. Jasmine rice (white or brown)
    51. Thai vegetarian coconut milk curry
    52. Pumpkin in any form other than pie
    53. Fresh apple pear or plum gallette
    54. Quince in any form — I wasn’t nuts about it, but I’m willing to give it another shot.
    55. Escarole, endive or arugula
    56. Sprouts other than mung bean
    57. Naturally brewed soy sauce
    58. Dried shiitake mushrooms — Dried, fresh, it’s all good.
    59. Unusually colored vegetables (purple cauliflower, blue potatoes, chocolate bell peppers…)

    60. Fresh peach ice cream
    61. Chevre
    62. Medjool dates
    63. Kheer — I don’t think I’ve ever met a rice pudding I didn’t like.
    64. Flourless chocolate cake
    65. Grilled corn on the cob
    66. Black bean (or any other bean) vegetarian chili
    67. Tempeh
    68. Seitan or wheat gluten
    69. Gorgonzola or any other blue veined cheese

    70. Sweet potato fries
    71. Homemade au gratin potatoes
    72. Cream of asparagus soup
    73. Artichoke-Parmesan dip
    74. Mushroom risotto

    75. Fermented black beans
    76. Garlic scapes
    77. Fresh new baby peas
    78. Kalamata olives — Not my favorites but good enough.
    79. Preserved lemons
    80. Fried green tomatoes
    81. Chinese scallion pancakes These are actually oh my list of things I want to make this week.
    82. Cheese souffle
    83. Fried apples
    84. Homemade frijoles refritos
    85. Pasta fagiole
    86. Macadamia nuts in any form

    87. Paw paw in any form
    88. Grilled cheese sandwich of any kind — The best lunch on the planet: Grilled cheese and tomato soup.
    89. Paneer cheese

    90. Ma Po Tofu (vegetarian style–no pork!) — I’ve only ever had it with the pork, but it’s still darn good.
    91. Fresh pasta in any form
    92. Grilled leeks, scallions or ramps
    93. Green papaya salad — I wish I could find green papayas in local markets.
    94. Baked grain and vegetable stuffed tomatoes
    95. Pickled ginger

    96. Methi greens
    97. Aloo paratha
    98. Kedgeree
    99. Okra — I struck this one out because okra by itself makes me want to urp. But then I remembered all the wonderful foods in which okra is a key ingredient and thought better of it.
    100. Roasted brussels sprouts

    Comment by Dargie — September 4, 2008 #

  11. 75 out of the 100 here. I’ll second the kedgeree/fish relation, but will concede it’s a likely Anglicization of a vegetarian dish.

    Great post. Very fun to fill out.

    Comment by Kate Hopkins — September 4, 2008 #

  12. You all are right–I was thinking of the original, non-Anglicized lentil, rice and onion dish, not the British version with smoked fish bits. I should have been more specific. I’ll fix the post to be more clear.

    Comment by Barbara — September 4, 2008 #

  13. I put this on my blog. I’m actually really surprised at how many of these I’ve had. There were several that we eat on a regular basis.

    Thanks for coming up with this list. Now I have a couple more things to add to my neverending list of things to try!

    http://besidespizza.blogspot.com/2008/09/vegetarian-hundred.html

    Comment by Dana — September 4, 2008 #

  14. No mango?

    Try Kesari or Dussehri Ripe Mango from India. The only thing far better is sex.

    Comment by gregor — September 4, 2008 #

  15. I’ve never heard of vegetarian kedgeree. I thought that the dish had to have smoked fish in it. Please enlighten me!

    Comment by Kiwi — September 4, 2008 #

  16. I love lots of vegetarian foods and dishes, but I am surprised by your inclusion of vegetarian Thai curries (which to me are an abomination–sorry! :) ). What inspired that choice? Thai coconut milk curries without shrimp paste or fish sauce are not traditional and not what I really think of as a vegetarian staple or anything…

    I’d add aloo mattar to your list, but that’s just because I cannot get enough of the stuff. :)

    Comment by Laura — September 4, 2008 #

  17. I’ve had at least 61 out of the 100, although it may be more because I wasn’t sure about some of them. I was surprised I got so many … but my husband and I are starting to eat way more vegetarian meals on a regular basis.

    Comment by Grace — September 4, 2008 #

  18. I wonder if most people know that traditional kimchi (the one most people think of as kimchi, Korean spicy pickled cabbage) isn’t vegetarian because it usually has shellfish in it (either oysters or baby shrimp)

    Comment by Han — September 4, 2008 #

  19. 101. Zaitun Parwadeh (zaitun parvardeh)

    so strange and wonderful and electric

    Comment by Ty Lookwell — September 4, 2008 #

  20. Never had pawpaw, but I’ve had custard apple, which wikipedia claims is similar.

    I’m at 67, not counting the custard apple.

    I’d love to see this done for particular areas of the world. e.g., the 100 Chinese dishes everyone must try.

    Comment by Michael Leuchtenburg — September 4, 2008 #

  21. I see vegetarians don’t eat fruit. Or fresh lima beans. Or heirloom melons. Etc.

    Comment by Jack at F&B — September 4, 2008 #

  22. Okay, here we go:
    http://lyspeth.com/blog/2008/09/04/the-vegetarians-100-just-for-me/

    I’ve eaten around 70% of these — some things I’m not 100% sure about!

    Comment by Alexis — September 4, 2008 #

  23. Thanks for this!

    Here are my results:

    http://the-ladylark.livejournal.com/68746.html

    Comment by Ladylark — September 4, 2008 #

  24. 102. nutella

    Comment by Pam — September 4, 2008 #

  25. Great list – I have eaten about 75 of your list. There are some no-way no-how no-matter-how cooked (beets, tofu, kimchi, miso, figs) . There a couple I am going to have to look up as I have never heard of them and at least worth trying once. I would add more fruits – berries, melons, pineapple, citrus (oranges, limes, tangerines), peaches, nectarines, cherries, grapes, plums. Also more nuts – there isn’t a nut that has come touched my tastebuds that I have not liked.

    Comment by Maureen — September 4, 2008 #

  26. Gosh, what a great list!

    Interestingly enough, I as just staring at the steel cut oats in my pantry thinking: “I really need to eat those,” and it’s actually the ONLY thing on your list I hagven’t yet eaten. I bought them. I have good intentions. But not past the lips yet.

    My addition of must have items, that I eat all the time: watercress and orange salad with vinegrette (I eat this every week in winter); South Indian tomato rasam; Thai sticky rice with coconut milk and mango (a dessert).

    Comment by Diane — September 4, 2008 #

  27. Sticky rice with mango might even rank above mango lassi on my list of favorites, though they’re both great.

    Comment by Alexis — September 4, 2008 #

  28. Wow, easy! I’m already at 95/100, and the main reason I haven’t made them all is that I simply don’t like tofu or related products.

    Comment by 4-year vegetarian — September 4, 2008 #

  29. I love that I get 89 in this but I’d be quite happy to eat all 100 if I had the time to learn everything you have to teach me. I quite like tempeh if its well enough seasoned. I’ve enjoyed okra in indian food and deep fried, but never made it myself.

    Comment by Jennywenny — September 5, 2008 #

  30. 1. Real macaroni and cheese, made from scratch and baked
    2. Tabouleh
    3. Freshly baked bread, straight from the oven (preferably with homemade strawberry jam)
    4. Fresh figs
    5. Fresh pomegranate
    6. Indian dal of any sort
    7. Imam bayildi
    8. Pressed spiced Chinese tofu (not sure exactly what you mean by this – pressed tofu with Chinese five-spice? Tofu cooked in a Chinese way with spices? Or something more specific?)
    9. Freshly made hummus
    10. Tahini
    11. Kimchi
    12. Miso
    13. Falafel
    14. Potato and pea filled samosas
    15. Homemade yogurt (Just learned to make this (a soy version), I love it)
    16. Muhammara
    17. Brie en croute (not vegan)
    18. Spanikopita
    19. Fresh, vine-ripened heirloom tomatoes
    20. Insalata caprese (not vegan)
    21. Stir-fried greens (gai lan, bok choi, pea shoots, kale, chard or collards)
    22. Freshly made salsa
    23. Freshly made guacamole
    24. Creme brulee (I’ve seen vegan versions of this…)
    25. Fava beans
    26. Chinese cold sesame peanut noodles
    27. Fattoush
    28. New potatoes
    29. Coleslaw
    30. Ratatouille
    31. Baba ganoush
    32. Winter squash

    33. Roasted beets
    34. Baked sweet potatoes
    35. Plantains
    36. Chocolate truffles
    37. Garlic mashed potatoes

    38. Fresh water chestnuts (I have no idea if I’ve had fresh. I’ve definitely had canned…?)
    39. Steel cut oats
    40. Quinoa
    41. Grilled portabello mushrooms

    42. Chipotle en adobo
    43. Stone ground whole grain cornmeal
    44. Freshly made corn or wheat tortillas
    45. Frittata
    46. Basil pesto
    47. Roasted garlic
    48. Raita of any type
    49. Mango lassi
    50. Jasmine rice (white or brown)
    51. Thai vegetarian coconut milk curry
    52. Pumpkin in any form other than pie
    53. Fresh apple pear or plum gallette
    54. Quince in any form
    55. Escarole, endive or arugula
    56. Sprouts other than mung bean

    57. Naturally brewed soy sauce (not sure what constitutes “naturally brewed”?)
    58. Dried shiitake mushrooms
    59. Unusually colored vegetables (purple cauliflower, blue potatoes, chocolate bell peppers…)

    60. Fresh peach ice cream
    61. Chevre
    62. Medjool dates
    63. Kheer
    64. Flourless chocolate cake
    65. Grilled corn on the cob
    66. Black bean (or any other bean) vegetarian chili
    67. Tempeh
    68. Seitan or wheat gluten
    69. Gorgonzola or any other blue veined cheese
    70. Sweet potato fries
    71. Homemade au gratin potatoes

    72. Cream of asparagus soup
    73. Artichoke-Parmesan dip
    74. Mushroom risotto
    75. Fermented black beans
    76. Garlic scapes
    77. Fresh new baby peas
    78. Kalamata olives
    79. Preserved lemons

    80. Fried green tomatoes
    81. Chinese scallion pancakes
    82. Cheese souffle
    83. Fried apples
    84. Homemade frijoles refritos
    85. Pasta fagiole
    86. Macadamia nuts in any form
    87. Paw paw in any form
    88. Grilled cheese sandwich of any kind
    89. Paneer cheese

    90. Ma Po Tofu (vegetarian style–no pork!)
    91. Fresh pasta in any form
    92. Grilled leeks, scallions or ramps
    93. Green papaya salad (love this)
    94. Baked grain and vegetable stuffed tomatoes
    95. Pickled ginger

    96. Methi greens
    97. Aloo paratha
    98. Kedgeree (the original Indian version without the smoked fish, not the British version with fish) (Kind of – I’ve had Indonesian bubur, which I think is similar)
    99. Okra
    100. Roasted brussels sprouts

    Also, there’s already been a vegan version of this – http://bittersweetblog.wordpress.com/2008/08/21/the-vegans-hundred/. :) I think I like yours better, though…

    Comment by Morgyn — September 5, 2008 #

  31. Hmm I’m at 89. Not bad I suppose.

    Comment by mujeresliebres — September 5, 2008 #

  32. 74 out of 100. I was sure I would get a higher number……

    Comment by Eva — September 5, 2008 #

  33. 90. Ma Po Tofu (vegetarian style–no pork!)

    just fyi, try asking for ma la tofu instead of ma po tofu. same thing, no meat (assuming the restaurant really knows sichuan cooking).

    overall an eh okay list. roasted brussels sprouts are the bomb.

    Comment by chinafoodsgal — September 5, 2008 #

  34. Great list, thanks!
    Can’t wait to try some of those!

    http://www.tofuaddict.com/blog/

    Comment by skyriser — September 5, 2008 #

  35. yup, i’ve now seen both the non-vegetarian list and your list: your list wins! whoohoo! and i’m not a vegetarian!

    but who doesn’t love vegetables?

    great list — a wonderful trip down memory lane.

    Comment by karen marie — September 5, 2008 #

  36. 78; I’ve probably had 4 others but don’t specifically remember. Almost exactly as many as the Omnivore’s Hundred. I’ve made a surprisingly large number of these as well, 35. Even grown garlic scapes. (I meant to grow garlic but that’s another story…) Does that make it 36?

    Fresh baby peas! Garlic scapes! Fresh water chestnut!! All delicious. Frittatas are a staple in my house.

    Freshly made corn tortillas bring back a fond memory. I spent much of my time in Cancun looking for Mexico, darnit. That place is far too American; I would have stayed at home if that’s what I wanted. Even more, I wanted fresh made tortillas. I eventually found Mexico by asking my guide where his mom bought her produce, which yielded the location of the local market. (It took quite some time for him to believe I really wanted that information. This is a reaction I’ve had around the world.)

    Fresh tortillas were more elusive. Every place I went, even the local Mexican ones (ah, that pollo mole was much better than the banquet my hotel served for New Year’s, the more so for being an unexpected find), used store-bought, which was like eating Wonderbread. Then luck struck. We went to a botantical park with a section of pre-Columbian foods. That day there happened to be a cooking demonstration. I stood there, stuffing myself with fresh-hot corn tortillas and fresh salsa-like stuff, till the next batch of tourists arrived and demanded their share.

    I’ve got to try me some paratha and some kheer.

    I would add Floating Island to that list, for the sheer luxuriousness. If not Floating Island, than creme anglaise.

    Comment by Harry — September 5, 2008 #

  37. Here’s my list: http://kroker.livejournal.com/671903.html

    :)
    k.

    Comment by kicki — September 5, 2008 #

  38. 91/100!

    1. Real macaroni and cheese, made from scratch and baked
    2. Tabouleh
    3. Freshly baked bread, straight from the oven (preferably with homemade strawberry jam)
    4. Fresh figs
    5. Fresh pomegranate
    6. Indian dal of any sort
    7. Imam bayildi
    8. Pressed spiced Chinese tofu
    9. Freshly made hummus
    10. Tahini
    11. Kimchi
    12. Miso
    13. Falafel
    14. Potato and pea filled samosas
    15. Homemade yogurt
    16. Muhammara
    17. Brie en croute
    18. Spanikopita
    19. Fresh, vine-ripened heirloom tomatoes
    20. Insalata caprese
    21. Stir-fried greens (gai lan, bok choi, pea shoots, kale, chard or collards)
    22. Freshly made salsa
    23. Freshly made guacamole
    24. Creme brulee
    25. Fava beans
    26. Chinese cold sesame peanut noodles
    27. Fattoush
    28. New potatoes
    29. Coleslaw
    30. Ratatouille
    31. Baba ganoush
    32. Winter squash
    33. Roasted beets
    34. Baked sweet potatoes
    35. Plantains
    36. Chocolate truffles
    37. Garlic mashed potatoes
    38. Fresh water chestnuts
    39. Steel cut oats
    40. Quinoa
    41. Grilled portabello mushrooms
    42. Chipotle en adobo
    43. Stone ground whole grain cornmeal
    44. Freshly made corn or wheat tortillas
    45. Frittata
    46. Basil pesto
    47. Roasted garlic
    48. Raita of any type
    49. Mango lassi
    50. Jasmine rice (white or brown)
    51. Thai vegetarian coconut milk curry
    52. Pumpkin in any form other than pie
    53. Fresh apple pear or plum gallette
    54. Quince in any form
    55. Escarole, endive or arugula
    56. Sprouts other than mung bean
    57. Naturally brewed soy sauce
    58. Dried shiitake mushrooms
    59. Unusually colored vegetables (purple cauliflower, blue potatoes, chocolate bell peppers…)
    60. Fresh peach ice cream
    61. Chevre
    62. Medjool dates
    63. Kheer
    64. Flourless chocolate cake
    65. Grilled corn on the cob
    66. Black bean (or any other bean) vegetarian chili
    67. Tempeh
    68. Seitan or wheat gluten
    69. Gorgonzola or any other blue veined cheese
    70. Sweet potato fries
    71. Homemade au gratin potatoes
    72. Cream of asparagus soup
    73. Artichoke-Parmesan dip
    74. Mushroom risotto
    75. Fermented black beans
    76. Garlic scapes
    77. Fresh new baby peas
    78. Kalamata olives
    79. Preserved lemons
    80. Fried green tomatoes
    81. Chinese scallion pancakes
    82. Cheese souffle
    83. Fried apples
    84. Homemade frijoles refritos – not yet but soon!
    85. Pasta fagiole
    86. Macadamia nuts in any form
    87. Paw paw in any form
    88. Grilled cheese sandwich of any kind
    89. Paneer cheese
    90. Ma Po Tofu (vegetarian style–no pork!) mmmmmm
    91. Fresh pasta in any form
    92. Grilled leeks, scallions or ramps
    93. Green papaya salad
    94. Baked grain and vegetable stuffed tomatoes
    95. Pickled ginger
    96. Methi greens
    97. Aloo paratha
    98. Kedgeree (the original Indian version without the smoked fish, not the British version with fish)
    99. Okra
    100. Roasted brussels sprouts

    Comment by bread and roses — September 5, 2008 #

  39. Barbara,
    Great list. I’ve published my response on my blog

    I added a few South Indian things to the list as they aren’t very well-known outside South India.

    Comment by Jaya — September 6, 2008 #

  40. anything But brussel sprouts:O)

    Comment by dinzie — September 6, 2008 #

  41. http://bard-bloom.livejournal.com/106015.html

    Comment by Bard Bloom — September 6, 2008 #

  42. I stumbled upon this and your blog. I had done a vegetarian 100 too a little while ago.

    Comment by maybelles mom (feeding maybelle) — September 7, 2008 #

  43. Barbara,

    Ah, this is too easy. I’m 100 for 100.

    Maybe I need to start a “really exotic 100″.

    Comment by FuzzyChef — September 7, 2008 #

  44. 97/101 for me, from a meat eater I thought that was pretty good. thanks for the fun!

    Comment by Princess Steph — September 7, 2008 #

  45. Jaya: Rasam was on my “must have” 100 list too. I couldn’t go a week without it…
    :)

    Comment by Diane — September 7, 2008 #

  46. I’m really glad somebody started a vegetarian list! 94/100 : )
    here’s mine.

    Comment by Sonia — September 8, 2008 #

  47. At a rough count I’ve eaten 89 of your hundred, Barbara, and I’m very much a carnivore! Btw, #61 and #62 are a match made in heaven.

    Comment by Trig — September 8, 2008 #

  48. Add a few things to the lis, all from India.
    -Sour mango juice flavored with a summer spices and lemon
    -Ber (wood apple) sherbet
    -Dosas any which way you can

    Khichdi is a hearty rice + mung beans stew. Depending upon your preferences it can be flavored with ginger+green chillis+mustard, cumin fenugreek seasoning (use olive oil), curry leaves, freshly chopped cilantro, asafoetida. Or else do away with the asafoetida and use a mix of coriander powder, garlic, and onion. Don’t forget to add turmeric powder early on and a few veggies of your choice. It is not rare in Eastern and Western India to have khicdi with a few pieces of fried fish – pomfret in the West and rohu in the East. But a vegetarian gourmet would recoil from it.

    Comment by kaangeya — September 8, 2008 #

  49. I did a lot better on this one; 88 versus 58 on the omnivorous list. The only one of the rest that I’m not at least willing to try are roasted brussels sprouts.

    Jaya: how can you have South Indian additions without masala dosa? ;)

    Comment by Andrea — September 9, 2008 #

  50. 1. Real macaroni and cheese, made from scratch and baked
    2. Tabouleh
    3. Freshly baked bread, straight from the oven (preferably with homemade strawberry jam)
    4. Fresh figs
    5. Fresh pomegranate
    6. Indian dal of any sort
    7. Imam bayildi
    8. Pressed spiced Chinese tofu
    9. Freshly made hummus
    10. Tahini
    11. Kimchi
    12. Miso
    13. Falafel
    14. Potato and pea filled samosas
    15. Homemade yogurt — yes, but not for many years.
    16. Muhammara
    17. Brie en croute
    18. Spanikopita
    19. Fresh, vine-ripened heirloom tomatoes
    20. Insalata caprese
    21. Stir-fried greens (gai lan, bok choi, pea shoots, kale, chard or collards)
    22. Freshly made salsa
    23. Freshly made guacamole
    24. Creme brulee
    25. Fava beans
    26. Chinese cold sesame peanut noodles

    27. Fattoush
    28. New potatoes
    29. Coleslaw

    30. Ratatouille
    31. Baba ganoush
    32. Winter squash
    33. Roasted beets
    34. Baked sweet potatoes
    35. Plantains
    36. Chocolate truffles
    37. Garlic mashed potatoes
    38. Fresh water chestnuts
    39. Steel cut oats
    40. Quinoa
    41. Grilled portabello mushrooms
    42. Chipotle en adobo

    43. Stone ground whole grain cornmeal
    44. Freshly made corn or wheat tortillas
    45. Frittata
    46. Basil pesto
    47. Roasted garlic
    48. Raita of any type
    49. Mango lassi
    50. Jasmine rice (white or brown)
    51. Thai vegetarian coconut milk curry
    52. Pumpkin in any form other than pie
    53. Fresh apple pear or plum gallette

    54. Quince in any form
    55. Escarole, endive or arugula
    56. Sprouts other than mung bean
    57. Naturally brewed soy sauce
    58. Dried shiitake mushrooms
    59. Unusually colored vegetables (purple cauliflower, blue potatoes, chocolate bell peppers…)

    60. Fresh peach ice cream — I assume “fresh” here means “homemade”?
    61. Chevre
    62. Medjool dates
    63. Kheer
    64. Flourless chocolate cake
    65. Grilled corn on the cob
    66. Black bean (or any other bean) vegetarian chili

    67. Tempeh
    68. Seitan or wheat gluten
    69. Gorgonzola or any other blue veined cheese
    70. Sweet potato fries
    71. Homemade au gratin potatoes
    72. Cream of asparagus soup
    73. Artichoke-Parmesan dip
    74. Mushroom risotto
    75. Fermented black beans

    76. Garlic scapes — does green garlic count?
    77. Fresh new baby peas
    78. Kalamata olives
    79. Preserved lemons
    80. Fried green tomatoes
    81. Chinese scallion pancakes
    82. Cheese souffle

    83. Fried apples
    84. Homemade frijoles refritos
    85. Pasta fagiole
    86. Macadamia nuts in any form

    87. Paw paw in any form
    88. Grilled cheese sandwich of any kind
    89. Paneer cheese
    90. Ma Po Tofu (vegetarian style–no pork!)
    91. Fresh pasta in any form
    92. Grilled leeks, scallions or ramps
    93. Green papaya salad
    94. Baked grain and vegetable stuffed tomatoes
    95. Pickled ginger
    96. Methi greens
    97. Aloo paratha

    98. Kedgeree (the original Indian version without the smoked fish, not the British version with fish)
    99. Okra
    100. Roasted brussels sprouts

    Comment by Andrea — September 9, 2008 #

  51. *great* list! Thanks for pointing me in the direction of muhammara, steel-cut oats, and garlic scapes, none of which I’ve run into. Looks like I will need to make the first two and grow the third :-).

    I don’t think I’ve had fresh tortillas, but have had more than my share of fresh chapatis lovingly made by my mother-in-law (as well as my own poor imitations), so I’m going to count that as a half ;-).

    I would add:

    m’jadra (said to be the “lentil soup” Esau traded his son for; on a hungry day, I’d be tempted too – esp with plenty of yoghurt and coriander, and some of that glorious ripe-tomato fattoush!)

    dhokla (snack heaven)

    dahi vada

    bhel or pani puri… ok, maybe I should just say chaat and be done with it. mmmmmm – tamarind chutney!

    sabudana kichidi (made with sago and peanuts, and definitely vegetarian)

    grilled haloumi

    masala dosa

    wood-fired margherita pizza

    raclette (both the cheese and the dish)

    carrot halva

    balsamic vinegar-glazed roast vegetables (anything you like, but pumpkin, squash, fennel and parsnips are top of the list)

    fennel and orange salad

    cha soba salad

    tempura asparagus inside-out nori rolls (asparagus is hot, sushi rice is cold – a small, exquisite flavour explosion)

    penne all’arrabiata

    ginger tea (my pregnancy staple)

    turkish apple tea

    nasu dengaku (the japanese answer to imam bayildi ;-)?)

    spinach gomayogoshi

    seaweed salad

    edamame

    ruccola pesto

    pumpkin, aubergine and fennel tagine with couscous

    veggie banh xeo (ok, fish sauce so not really veggie – but I feel I can live with this exception…)

    veggie rice paper rolls

    … ok, I’m not done, but I am seriously hungry… off to lunch for me!

    Comment by helen — September 9, 2008 #

  52. My results are here.

    I’ve never been impressed by a vegetarian ma po tofu — but then again, I have strong memories of (delicious) pork-based originals.

    I’ve also found that vegetarian green papaya salads aren’t a patch on the originals with fish sauce and pickled crab. I saw someone above mention a similar problem with true vegetarian Thai curries — I admit that I turn a blind eye to the fish sauce in those, in return for the added flavour.

    From this corner of the world, my must-have vegetarian food is probably an excellent peanut sauce, whether on gado-gado, vegetarian satay, vegetarian rujak, on emping crackers, or similar…

    Comment by Ineke — September 10, 2008 #

  53. 98! Everything except Imam bayildi and Kheer.

    By the way, I just posted a “100 Chinese Foods to Try” list on my site. Hope you enjoy!

    http://appetiteforchina.com/100-chinese-foods-to-try-before-you-die

    Comment by AppetiteforChina — September 13, 2008 #

  54. I debated adding masala dosa but I felt it was a little too common. Plus, I’ve never craved it as I have some of the others I added.

    I struggled more with adding the snacks than I did with masala dosa – bhelpuri, paav bhaji, etc.

    Comment by Jaya — September 13, 2008 #

  55. wow ! so many vegetarian dishes, and not many from india !!! so, even the rest of the world eats vegetarian at times, heh ?

    i don’t think i can write it all down, but just think of the wonderful curries of kerala, or, south of india, even. include sambar, at least ! and, i too vote for masala dosa.

    Comment by renu — September 14, 2008 #

  56. Hi. Great list! I added it to my site:
    http://thehappyrunner.blogspot.com/2008/09/more-about-food-this-time-of-list.html

    Comment by The Happy Runner — September 15, 2008 #

  57. The list is way too easy!!! That said, it makes me look better than the omnivores 100 (only 75 there)

    Comment by shweta — September 22, 2008 #

  58. 81/100!

    http://gourmanderie.wordpress.com/2008/09/24/bandwagon-the-vegetarians-hundred/

    Comment by Schatzi — October 11, 2008 #

  59. Just completed your The Vegetarian Hundred meme and posted to my blog – its a good list. Thanks for creating it.

    Comment by ozquilter — March 31, 2009 #

  60. Just completed your Vegetarian Hundred meme and posted to my blog – got 98 out of 100, its a good list, thanks for creating it.

    Comment by ozquilter — March 31, 2009 #

  61. Loads of great stuff you have here! i’m constantly searching for vegetarian-related blogs and i stumbled your site. I found your blog on Google and read a few of your other posts. I just added you to my Google Reader. Keep up the good work! Look forward to reading more from you in the future. – Shane

    Comment by Dentists Moreno Valley — January 3, 2010 #

  62. Interesting 100 list. I have eaten 75 of them. Enjoyed very much reading your blog and all the comments from readers. Planning on starting a vegetarian food blog of my own soon. Soooo many wonderful foods in the world to savor!

    Comment by Lois — January 10, 2010 #

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